The Proven Platter – Honduras, June 2023
9
May, 2023

The Proven Platter – Honduras, June 2023

The cuisine of Honduras is a delightful fusion of Central American, Mesoamerican (Lenca), Spanish, Caribbean, African, and Garifuna cuisines; a product of its own roots and a marriage of cuisines that it came in historic or geographic proximity with. The dishes, whether savory or sweet, are rich in flavor and use ingredients that are locally grown or sourced. This month’s dish, Honduran Yucca cake, features some quintessential Honduran ingredients, including yucca (cassava) and coconut milk. Somewhat reminiscent of a tres leches cake in that this recipe also uses three kinds of “milk,” coconut, evaporated and condensed, the yucca cake is vastly different in texture and taste as it uses grated yucca as the “flour.” It is almost less cake and more like a bread (zucchini bread comes to mind), if you will. Extremely flavorful, due to the mix of spices used, and somewhat decadent, a slice of this cake would be perfect with coffee as an evening snack or as dessert. Details

8
Aug, 2022

The Proven Platter – Uganda, September 2022

Uganda is known as the “fruit basket” of East Africa and is the second largest producer of fruits and vegetables in Sub-Saharan Africa. Leaning into this abundance, Ugandan desserts rely heavily on fruits. During the hotter months of the year, fruit flavored ice lollies or popsicles, known locally as “barafu,” are sold in the markets. Avocados, known as “ova,” are plentiful in Uganda. A happy confluence of factors – consistent rainfall, tropical temperatures, and fertile soil – have led to avocados being cultivated in Uganda since the 1550s. This recipe derives inspiration from both the barafu and the fruits most commonly available and consumed in Uganda (ova and lemon). Details

21
Jun, 2022

The Proven Platter – Democratic Republic of the Congo, August 2022

Caakiri is a simple but delicious couscous pudding that comes together quickly. It was originally made with native grains such as millet or maize and occasionally beans but now is most commonly made with couscous. It is best served fresh with your favorite fruit. Details

6
Apr, 2022

The Proven Platter—Malawi, May 2022

Located in Southeastern Africa, Malawi is known for the warmth and friendliness of her people. Hence, the nickname, the “Warm Heart of Africa.” The cuisine of this country skews traditional African and is dominated by ingredients that are products of two of its major industries: agriculture and fishing. Groundnuts (peanuts) are the most important legume crop in Malawi in volume produced and in the amount of area devoted to their cultivation. The crop also brings in significant revenue. Our dish for the month, in honor of Malawi, is Mtedza, a delightful, easy to make groundnut (peanut) cookie that utilizes ingredients found in most pantries. Mtedza will melt in your mouth, and if one doesn’t pay attention, this recipe that makes 14 cookies might end up serving just two! Details

13
Dec, 2021

The Proven Platter—Afghanistan, January 2022

In October, we announced that the Featured Project for January 2022 would be Afghanistan Libre’s work to support the mental health, wellbeing, and safety of survivors of gender-based violence and contemporary forms of slavery.  With a heavy heart, Afghanistan Libre has had to cease operations and is withdrawing all of its activities from Afghanistan due to the ongoing security concerns in Afghanistan.  We post this recipe in their honor.  Details

8
Apr, 2020

The Proven Platter – Nepal, May 2020

Fun fact: a large number of small Indian restaurants in the United States of America are actually run by Nepali immigrant chefs. Several serve Indian food along with (if one were to look at the fine print on the menu) some dishes that are of Nepali or Himalayan origin. But, repeat after me and loudly: Nepali cuisine is not Indian cuisine (our Nepali friends will appreciate us remembering this). Nepal, through its geographical and historical association with India and Tibet, has influences of both in its cuisine. However, the flavor profile is different. Nepali dishes use fewer spices and aromatics and less heat. Also, Nepali cuisine has a preponderance of vegetarian dishes. Second fun fact: “vegetarian” in Nepal can mean different things. It could mean “not meat and eggs” (dairy products such as milk and cheese are consumed, however) but it could also mean “not beef” (but include poultry and mutton). The latter is tied to the sanctity of cows in the Hindu faith.   Details